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The Milwaukee Area T.I. User Group Newsletter

World Wide 99ers

********* July 1999 **********

===================================

Club Officers

-------------

President - Ted Zychowicz - tedzychowicz@juno.com - 414-453-1034

Vice-President - Jonathon Johnson - johnsonn@milwaukee.tec.wi.us

Treasurer - Denis Dann - denisdann@yahoo.com - 414-545-5933

Newsletter - Gene Hitz - genehitz@juno.com - 414-535-0133

Geneve - Tim Tesch - ttesch@execpc.com

MAUG Web page - http://members.tripod.com/~genehitz/maug.html

*** Our Newsletters are now also on our web page ***

Mailing address - 4122 N. Glenway, Wauwatosa, WI 53222-1116

Main MAUG meeting - 3rd Saturdays - noon til 4PM

Mayfair Community Room, Mayfair Shopping Center, North Avenue &
Hwy 100

PC Hocus meeting (PC SIG) - 3rd Thursday - 7PM til 10PM

Franklin State Bank, 7000 South 76st Street

Annual dues now only $5.00

newsletters by email

===========================

Index: Part I

(01) The President's Corner

(02) TI99: Double-Whammy Weekend!

(03) A Short Puzzle For July

(04) TI99: SNUG FAQ V6.20.99(03)

(05) TI99: MUG99 Review

(06) Actual Office Quotes

(07) INTERESTING PLACES TO VISIT ON THE INTERNET

(08) The Chicago TI International World Faire

(09) Twisted Sayings

(10) Top 4 Humor and Prank Files (on the internet)

(11) New Interesting Email Lists

(12) The Art of Assembly -- by Bruce Harrison

Part II

(13) Why the Human Race is in Trouble

(14) Breaking Doom of Mondular -- by Mike Wright

(15) The Lord's Prayer

(16) July Puzzle Answer

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

MICROSOFT KEEPS EYE ON UPSTART

Who was the number one visitor to the new Linux.com site in May? Microsoft.
Hits from the software giant totaled more than 15,000 in the first two
weeks, according to site operator VA Linux Systems. It appears Linux really
does make Microsoft nervous. But you knew that.

DEMO HELL

Why you should always do a dry run:

At Microsoft's Technet briefing in Phoenix, a Microsoft representative
showed off FrontPage 2000, stressing its integration with Office 2000.
Perhaps the message would have gone over better if the page he'd created
in FrontPage could be read by Internet Explorer 4.0. The Microsoftie had
to bring up Netscape Navigator to view the file. "It doesn't play well
together.", he sheepishly admitted.

Worm.ExploreZip

And another virus strikes. Along with the Melissa virus, these two
alone have cost U.S. companies $7.6 billion. Again this virus only attacks
Microsoft email programs. When are they going to learn and start running
safe programs?

Microsoft & the DOJ

Does anyone believe that the Dept. of Justice is going to do more than
scold Microsoft? Microsoft is a bigger monopoly than I.B.M, AT&T, Standard
Oil, and other monopolies combined but perhaps Microsoft is just too big
and rich for the DOJ to mess with???

=========================================

Dear Gene,

Came home from Cleveland and found the very last issue of MICROpendium
waiting for me. We'll all miss "The Mag"! Thanks to your foresight, though,
we now have a very nice newsletter available vis the internet, so that
a way exists to keep in touch.

My modest proposal is this: In that last MICROpendium was Part 76 of
my Art of Assembly series. Here on my PC's hard drive, I have parts 77
thru 83, already written (part 83 is the "farewell" part) but of course
now not to be published.

If you're interested, I could very easily pass these along to you for
inclusion in your newsletter. They're simple .txt files, so they should
be easy to integrate, except that you might want to split the bigger ones
into more than one issue, and that's okay with me.

Let me know how you feel about this.

Best Regards,

Bruce

------------------------

Dear Bruce,

That'd be great. We'd be glad to include them in our newsletter.

Best Regards,

Gene

========================================

(01) The Presidents Corner

By Ted Zychowicz

president MAUG

This past June I went to the TI MUG99 in Cleveland, Ohio. I met many
of the TI'ers I have read about.

I sat in on Bruce Harrisons conference, and heard him speak of the
end of an era.

He will no longer write software for the TI or GENEVE. That was a sad
day for all of us.

I then moderated an open forum on the Geneve. Next I was at the MUG
meeting, where Glenn Bernasek of TICHIPS told us this would be the last
TIMUG .

So this is another sad item of the day. I then sat in on Lew King showing
how a TI can connect up at 43,000 bps+.

I then saw Charles Good demonstrating the TI-74. All the conferences
were very informative.

To find out more see Charles Good review elsewhere in this newsletter.

After I get home from the MUG99 I found out that MICROpendium has stopped
publishing, this was the third sad item and the last of the weekend.

With all this sad news I am announcing some good news . This newsletter
is now not just for the Milwaukee Area User Group, it is also the World
Wide 99 electronic newsletter.

We hope to have articles of interest by well known authors. Here are
some of the comments from the list server;

From Richard Bell

Hi Ted, the idea sounds good to me. I'll do my part with my BBS.

From Lew King

That sounds just great Ted. The MAUG News Letter has worked out very
well, even for those of us who use the TI for e-mail. So a world wide one
in the same format would be excellent.

As I was getting ready to send this article to our editor I heard that
Mike Wright is not going to continue to update PC99.

This has happened after much criticism of his great emulator. I hope
he will change his mind, as the great majority of TI'ers appreciate his
effort. Althrough it takes some of us more time than others to afford his
program than others.

=======================================

(02) TI99: Double-Whammy Weekend!

From: MIke Wright <mjmw@ix.netcom.com>

I haven't felt this bad about my TI since that day in 1983 when I was
monitoring an AP news wire that had the effrontery to announce that TI
had pulled out of the Home Computer business.

This weekend (June 12, 1999) I attended the 1999 MUG meeting in Brook
Park, OH and was having a wonderful time. There was free stuff up the wazoo
and other good stuff for sale. I even found a book (after all these years)
on the TI that I had never seen. Thanks to Dan Eicher, I discovered the
trick of putting audio tracks on a CD and we began a project to move the
TI Assembly Language tapes on to the CaDD CD, which was shown as a prototype
at the MUG.

Then at about 5:00P Glenn Bernasek got everyone together for the awards,
and announced that this would be the last MUG organized by TI-Chips. Since
Charles Good had already relinquished the mantle last year, that was the
end of it. Bad, bad, news.

I am going to leave out the return trip home which ended up in a five-hour
delay thanks to bad weather in the Detroit area. But I got home at 2:00A
this morning and spotted the orange cover of MICROpendium. Oh, good I thought.
That makes up for the trip. And then I read the cover: MICROPENDIUM CEASES
PUBLICATION, in a simple black border. Bad, bad, bad news.

On that day in 1983, I was the editor of the Magnetic newsletter (Magnetic
= Massachusetts Group of Ninety-Nine equipped computers). I wrote something
like: "... It does not matter that TI has pulled out ... your machine will
still power up, the title screen will still come up, and you can still
use the machine."

Today, I want to be brave and reiterate that feeling, but I have a disquieting
feeling of gloom. There is something about hard copy that all the electronic
stuff just doesn't replace. And MICROpendium is the _last_ commercial publication
(not counting things like the newsletters that are still put out).

So where to go from here. My initial thought is that I hoped that "someone"
would pick it up -- much as we hoped that CorComp or Myarc would "pick
up" the 99/4A and maybe even the 99/8. The word Tex-Comp is the only one
that comes to mind, but I'll bet that Larry Hoffman doesn't want to get
involved in losing even more money on the TI. Besides, who has the time
to do this these days?

When the Titanic hit the iceberg, there must have been a lot of people
who thought it would not sink. Then as time passed, the realization set
in. Of course when the stern was high in the air there was no question.
Is the double-whammy weekend our Titanic? Is the unsinkable TI about to
go down? I hope not.

I wanted to try and make some suggestions for "onward and upward", but
I am pretty depressed right now. I need to rebound, but it won't happen
for a while.

In the meantime, we should give thanks to Tom Wills and the list sever.
We may not always agree with what is said, but are we not now in the lifeboat?

------------------------------

From: Swim4home@aol.com

Hi Mike, first let me say how great it was to meet you all at the MUG.
Like you, I am suffering from a serious amount of depression after returning
home. ( In fact I probrably shouldn't be typing now as I am sure I'll say
things I shouldn't) The announcement that Harrison software would no longer
publish for the 4a was quite a blow to me. (even though I knew it was coming,
I guess I didn't let it sink in) Over the last few years I had the pleasure
(and I do mean pleasure) of being one of Bruce Harrison's testers and I
played a very small part in helping him with the MIDI Master 99 series
of prgrm's. I had gotten very close with Bruce and it saddens me no end
that I will no longer share the experience of working on 4a progrm's with
him.

I also will now tell you a story that I'm sure will depress you even
further. About 4 weeks ago I received a call from Don of Cecure Electronics.
He asked me if I would be interested in buying him out. To make a long
story short, a deal was struck and the weekend previous to the MUG I showed
up at Cecure in Muskego with a 24' Ryder Rental truck which we loaded to
the gills with TI and CC-40 stuff.

I was going to return to Muskego after the MUG to pick up the remaining
MYARC, RAVE, MBP,HSGPL (SNUG produced) as well as all the EPROM, PAL, etc.
info which Don said he had on dsk. I had also worked out (I thought) with
Don to get all the stuff folks had sent to him and never got back. Although
I wasn't going to be resposible for any money's folks had sent to him,
I at least wanted to get the equipment back to the right hands and start
to once again produce MYARC etc for the community. Well, since I left Muskego
that weekend I have not been able to contact Don and do not know of his
whereabouts or the status of the remaining equipment. So, I guess we are
indeed in the Lifeboat. :(

====================================

 

(03) A Short Puzzle For July

H I J K L M N O

What is it??

(answer at the end of the newsletter)

=====================================

(04) TI99: SNUG FAQ V6.20.99

From: EICHER@delphi.com

I just spent another 4 hours working on the snug faq, if anyone wants
a copy, please send your email address to athling@aol.com <= please
tell me you want the snug faq and leave and email address that can accept
attachements.

system 99 user-group (snug) -- Mannheim, Germany

 

====================================

(05) TI99: MUG99 Review

Charles Good <cgood@im3.com>

This event was sponsored by the two Cleveland TI user groups on June
11-12, 1999. The location was the beautiful Spang Mansion just south of
Hopkins International Airport. The building was in a wooded area and we
could see rabbits hopping by and were told that deer lurked among the nearby
trees.

The Cleveland groups went all out to give everybody a good time. They
almost emptied their treasury paying for table and chair rental, building
rental, and free food.

There was a free buffet Friday evening and a great after-the-show Saturday
evening pizza party. Attendees didn't have to pay for anything.

There was no admission fee and no fee to those who wanted tables. I
was told that 58 people put their names on the sign in sheet.

One of the major reasons for attending this kind of event is to meet
old friends. I met folks like Dave Szippl and Jim Krych whom I hadn't seen
in several years and thought had left the TI community. Lots of people
were literally giving away surplus TI equipment, and thankfully most of
it was taken by those who could use it.

I brought a very full carload of stuff to give away, donated by members
of the Lima User Group who now rely on PC99 for most of their 99/4A activity.

There were two seminar rooms and sometimes there were simultaneous seminars,
so I couldn't attend everything. However all the seminars are on video
tape, available postpaid by sending $10 to Glenn Bernasek Secretary - TI-Chips,
13246 Harper Road, Strongsville, OH 44136-3942 - GBBasic@aol.com

Bruce Harrison entitled his seminar "The end of an era" meaning that
he has decided not to write any more software for the 99/4a. He is doing
this, he says, because there are too many different kinds of hardware incompatibilities
and he is unable to test all possible hardware combinations.

As an example he cited my Micropendium review of his TI Bingo program.
In this review I stated that the program's speech doesn't work on my Geneve
with a Rave speech card. Well, Bruce has neither a Geneve nor a Rave speech
card.

Other examples he cited are: the initialization of chr$143 in some
menu programs, the failure of boot tracking to work with several different
hardware configurations, the fact that his software seems to work on some
Geneves and not others, it works on some SCSI cards and not others.

Geneves, Geneves fool his software into thinking there is an AMS card
in the system, there is new German hardware which he doesn't have.

Bruce declared that ALL HIS SOFTWARE IS NOW PUBLIC DOMAIN except his
midi software. This is available for a price from Richard Bell <Swim4home@aol.com>
who will also be SELLING REAL MIDI MASTER CABLES.

These are important announcements!

One of the seminars was the "MUG Conference" moderated by Glan Bernassek.

This was a discussion of user group survival. Groups represented at
this seminar included Southwest 99ers, Western New York, Chicago, CADD,
Milwaukee, Lima Ohio, Greater Akron, and West Penn. Discussion included
posting newsletters on the internet and archiving old software on CD rom
in PC99 format or some other way to preserve it forever.

Glen announced that there would NOT be another MUG conference hosted
by the Cleveland groups. This one emotionally and financially wore them
out. ( I personally know exactly how that works. That is why I am not doing
another MUG conference in Lima. At the 1998 Lima MUG conference I and one
other person were the only ones there from the Lima area!)

Jim Krych <jwkrych@nznet.net> invited all of us to a "Classic game
and computer show" at a nearby armory already scheduled for June 10-11,
2000 sponsored by the local Atari user group. The event will be free because
it is only costing $50 to rent the armory for 2 days due to Jim Krych's
military connections. This is GOOD NEWS!

I plan to attend. It was announced that the NEXT CHICAGO TI FAIRE will
be November 6 at the Evanston Public Library. This is also GOOD NEWS!

Mike Wright did not have official seminar time but he did demonstrate
PC99 and the latest version of his Cyc at his table. He told me that he
may put out an interum release of PC99 (version 5.2?) which will include
the John Guyon RS232 rom and disk controller rom.

The all native Windows 9.x version of PC99 is still not ready for release,
although it has been improved since its showing at Chicago last year. This
PC99 version is currently very slow on a Pendium 100 machine.

Lew King demonstrated how the West Penn user group's web site can be
read using Jeffery Brown's ZT4-80 software running on a 99/4A. This software
emulates 80 columns on the 99/4A screen and seems to run much more smoothly
(meaning it doesn't crash as often) than did Term 80.

I (Charles Good) demonstrated the TI74 and its PC Interface. This hand
held basic programmable calculator is smaller than but functionally almost
identical to the CC40. It uses a basic that is almost identical to TI extended
basic. You can purchase a very reliable $10 cassette interface or $45 PC
Interface that lets you load and save software to and from fully compatible
with all hexbus peripherals.

Unlike the CC40, you can still purchase the TI74 and its cassette or
PC interfaces new. These TI74 products are available on the internet from
www.hightechsolutions.com or telephone (360)653-1570.

The show ended with the presentation of the Jim Peterson achievement
awards.

TI Chips announced that it WILL CONTINUE to sponsor these awards in
the coming years.

This years recipients were:

Community Service ................... SW99ers

TI-99/4A Software .................. Bruce Harrison

TI-99/4A Hardware .................. System 99 User Group (SNUG)

Geneve 9640 ........................ Tim Tesch

User Groups Represented:

Chicago User Group

Computer Users of Erie

Hoosiers User Group

Lima User Group

Mid-South 99 User Group

Milwaukee Area User Group

North Coast 99ers

TI-Chips

West Penn 99ers

 

 

 

====================================

(06) Actual Office Quotes:

Quote from a recent meeting: "We are going to continue having these
meetings, everyday, until I find out why no work is getting done".

Quote from the Boss... "I didn't say it was your fault. I said I was
going to blame it on you."

A motivational sign at work: The beatings will continue until morale
improves.

A direct quote from the Boss: "We passed over a lot of good people to
get the ones we hired."

My Boss frequently gets lost in thought. That's because it's unfamiliar
territory.

My Boss said to me "What you see as a glass ceiling, I see as a protective
barrier.

My Boss needs a surge protector. That way his mouth would be buffered
from surprise spikes in his brain.

He's given automobile accident victims new hope for recovery. He walks,
talks, and performs rudimentary tasks... all without the benefit of a spine.

Some people climb the ladder of success. My Boss walked under it.

Quote from the Boss after overriding the decision of a task force he
created to find a solution: "I'm sorry if I ever gave you the impression
your input would have any effect on my decision for the outcome of this
project!"

HR Manager to job candidate: "I see you've had no computer training.
Although that qualifies you for upper management, it means you're under-qualified
for our entry level positions."

Quote from telephone inquiry: "We're only hiring one summer intern this
year and we won't start interviewing candidates for that position until
the Boss's daughter finishes her summer classes.

 

====================================

(07) INTERESTING PLACES TO VISIT ON THE INTERNET

by Nancy Preffitt -- ICON Missouri newsletter

Here are some more web sites that have come to my attention. I visited
all of them this time and thought they were pretty good. If you don't like
these, try some links from them and you'll soon run into something completely
different! That's the fun of surfing.

Mensa is the society for people with above average intelligence. Densa
is a parody of the famous Mensa quiz. It's got some joke type questions
that do require thought to answer correctly. Also has some games, which
I didn't explore. Check it out at http://www.pressanykey.com/densa/ .

The Compleat Carry-On Traveler at http://www.oratory.com/travel offers
extensive instruction on how to travel the world, carrying only one suitcase.
It's more than I'll ever need, but I did get some good packing tips that
will work to lighten my travel load. It has a travel library, travel resources
and links.

This is one that made me want to use my new found packing skills and
go. If you'd like to travel and do some "shun-piking" check out http://www.moon.com/road_trip/
. They have tours along several long national routes, including Routes
66 and 50, with interesting - and unusual - sites along the way. I think
this would be really great for a leisurely trip.

If you're in the market for a new or new-used car, visit http://www.edmunds.com
. The review I read called it "the most informative and entertaining site
we've seen in this genre, by several orders of magnitude". That seems extreme
to me, but it does offer a lot of information, including long term road
tests. It's a good place to visit before you start car shopping.

In order to stay healthy and energetic enough for everything you need
to do, check out http://www.phys.com . This site is loaded with simple
idea for staying healthy and happy. You can check out how healthy snack
foods are, as well as consult health calculators. These are easy to use.

 

====================================

(08) The Chicago TI International World Faire

Year of the "99"

The Chicago TI Users Group presents the

17th Annual Chicago TI International World Faire

supporting the TI994A and 9640

November 6, 1999

----------------

Evanston Public Library

Evanston, Illinois

(corner Church & Orrington)

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Vendors-Demonstrations-Seminars-User Groups

door prize drawings

-------------------

for further information contact:

Hal Shanafield (847) 864-8644

====================================

(09) Twisted Sayings

----------------

Dyslexics have more fnu

Clones are people, two

Entropy isn't what it used to be

Microbiology Lab: Staph Only!

Santa's elves are just a bunch of subordinate Clauses

Eschew obfuscation

186,000 miles/sec: Not just a good idea, it's the LAW!

Air Pollution is a mist-demeanor

Anything free is worth what you pay for it

Atheism is a non-prophet organization

COLE'S LAW: Thinly sliced cabbage

Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?

Editing is a rewording activity

Help stamp out and eradicate superfluous redundancy

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not sure

My reality check just bounced

Rap is to music what Etch-a-Sketch is to art

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

Energizer bunny arrested, charged with battery

No sense being pessimistic, it probably wouldn't work anyway

Boycott shampoo... Demand REAL poo!

IRS - Be audit you can be

 

====================================

 

(10) Top 4 Humor and Prank Files (on the internet)

Bad Day

http://www.pcworld.com/r/shw/1%2C2087%2C4100%2C00.html

Turn someone's Windows upside down.

Backpak

http://www.pcworld.com/r/shw/1%2C2087%2C4078%2C00.html

These bit map files make great prank wallpaper.

Wobble

http://www.pcworld.com/r/shw/1%2C2087%2C4099%2C00.html

Make your Windows 95 screen shake like jelly. You can vary the shaking
from a slight shudder to a near earthquake.

Win Error

http://www.pcworld.com/r/shw/1%2C2087%2C4098%2C00.html

Create fake error messages in Windows 95, from illegal-operation messages
to the infamous "blue screen of death."

=========================================

(11) New Interesting Email Lists

Mind & Body Digest

Easily digestible advice for healthy modern living. Twice per week,
Dan and Cathy will bring you advice on exercise, nutrition, supplements
and coping with stress. Ideal for people with busy schedules!

To subscribe, send an email to subscribe-mind-and-body@send.memail.com,

Women's Words

Inspirational and thought provoking quotations for women, and by women.
These little emails are a wonderful way to start the day.

Sometimes serious, sometimes hilarious, but always pithy and appropriate.
Share them with your friends.

To subscribe, send an email to subscribe-women@send.memail.com

Resident Alien

Hilarious commentary on life in the U.S.A. - from a foreigner's point
of view. A regular weekly dispatch from our very own correspondent in New
York City: Ian Cooper.

To subscribe send an email to subscribe-resident-alien@send.memail.com

Joke of the Week

If a daily joke is just too much to handle, then why not try the Joke
of the Week. Great jokes to share with friends - on a weekly schedule that
everyone can handle. Every Wednesday, we will send you a little bit of
humor therapy. Tell me, who couldn't use a little bit of laughter in their
lives!?

To subscribe, send an email to subscribe-jokeoftheweek@send.memail.com

=========================

(12) The Art of Assembly -- Part 77 -- Breaking New Ground -- by Bruce
Harrison

For the most part, this edition of The Art will deal with some details
of ways of making use of the AMS memory, but we'll also get into some stuff
dealing with the SCSI hard drive.

MIDI Album without Mini-Memory

While we were developing our AMS version of MIDI-Master, our friend
Richard Bell, who was testing our efforts, asked what turned out to be
an interesting question, "Why does Album still need the Mini-Memory when
there's plenty of memory in the AMS?"

The reason had to do with address mapping. The Album feature of MIDI-Master
was set up to use memory in the >7000 block (nearly all of that block).
The mapper chip in the AMS does not allow any of the AMS' pages to be mapped
to addrsses other than the >2000->3000 and >A000->F000 blocks.

We know this is true because we did controlled experiments that proved
this to be fact. Still, Richard Bell's question was one of those things
that nags at the programmer's mind night and day. Why indeed?

The Sudden Inspiration

Yes, we know what Thomas Edison said about inspiration versus perspiration,
and most of the time that applies, except that without the inspiration
the perspiration is just sweat.

The inspiration had to do with pages 0 and 1 of the AMS memory. Until
now, to our knowledge, nobody who's programmed for the AMS card has made
any use whatsoever of pages 0 and 1. Many don't even use pages 4 through
9 either, and that seems a waste.

Our AMS version of MIDI-Master uses pages 2 and 3 for its main program
code, and pages 4 through whatever for storing the music that it plays.
That's reasonably good use of memory, but there were still 8192 bytes of
perfectly good memory in pages 0 and 1, while we were having to plug in
the Mini-Memory to run Album.

It simply didn't make good sense. Finally the idea hit the brain: Use
page 0 or 1 mapped as if it were some legal area in high memory. In the
actual end product, that wound up being the use of page 1 mapped to the
area >C000 through >CFFF.

Code that "Moves Itself"

This isn't strictly speaking true, but the idea came from that AMS
Testing program that we helped Bob Carmany with.

Why I like the One-minute Page builder:
In that program there
were sections of code that re-located themselves from one AMS page to another
so that all pages of the AMS could be tested without destroying or losing
the program's own code.

In our Album case, we decided to use a small section of code outside
the actual Album code to move Album.

To do that, we first AORG to location >BFB8, so there's enough room
between there and >C000 to do a few things. First, the code starting at
>BFB8 initializes the AMS memory. At that point the mapping registers are
set so that page 0 is "mapped" to >0000, page 1 to >1000, etc. Pages 2
and 3 are then mapped to the area containing the main MIDI-Master code,
and page >B and >C are mapped to >B000 and >C000, where the Album code
resides.

Next, the little section of "move it" code checks to see if an AMS
has been found, and branches to a "sorry, no AMS found" message display
in the main program if no AMS is present.

So long as an AMS is there, the code proceeds to do its "move" operation.
First, it sets page 1 to map at >A000. Next it moves everything from >C000
to the end of Album's code into page 1, now masquerading as >A000. Now
with the Album's code all safely stashed in page 1, it re-maps page 1 to
appear as >C000, then jumps to >C000 to start executing Album.

Confused? Please don't get confused yet, as this soup gets thicker with
continued stirring. Album operates to do a few things on its own, such
as cataloging a disk, but to actually load and play music, it uses routines
in the main program part, which is sitting there in pages 2 and 3. Whenever
that happens, the main program does a re-mapping of the High Memory addresses,
so that >A000 thru >FFFF are actually pages 4 through 9 of the AMS.

Thus while the main program's routine is executing, >C000 is actually
page 6 (or higher) of the AMS card. None the less, the Album part is still
kept in page 1, so it doesn't get overwritten when music data gets put
into >C000.

Before Album branches into the main code, it sets a flag that's in
the main program's data section. Each routine that gets called by Album
has been modified so that before an exit from the routine, that flag is
checked, and if it's set, a mapping is done on the AMS to set page 1 back
to the >C000 address space. This way, control returns to Album, since page
1 is once again treated as >C000.

Yes, it sounds complicated, but it really isn't, once you understand
how the AMS card and its mapping registers work.

Workspace Registers

One potential problem when doing this kind of fooling around is the
possibility of losing one's workspace registers.

We "headed that off at the pass" by using two sets of registers, both
of which are in Ram Pad. This way, our register spaces don't get affected
by the mapping of pages in the AMS. The Album part uses >8300 thru >831F,
and the main program uses >8320 thru >833F.

Right at the start of the "move" section of Album, the workspace is
set by LWPI >8320, so that the "move" addresses can be kept in registers
and won't be affected by the move. Also, the code that does the re-mapping
operations, except for one operation in the "move" section, is all kept
in the main program's part, where pages 2 and 3 remain mapped to >2000
and >3000 throughout all phases of the program's running.

A Quick Review

MIDI-Master and its Album feature are contained in two E/A Option 5
program files. The first, MASEXA, has a header starting with >FFFF, so
that once it's been loaded, the second program file MASEXB will also be
loaded. MASEXA's header includes a load-point specified as >BFB8, and a
length just a little under 4096 (>1000) bytes. Thus the loader will place
through most of the >C000 area. At this point the AMS Mapper is inactivated,
so this stuff actually goes into pages >B and >C of the AMS memory.

MASEXB, which is nearly >2000 bytes, loads into >2000 and >3000, which
correspond to pages 2 and 3 of the AMS memory. These pages are not re-mapped
at any time during the program. After the code at >BFB8 does its "move"
operation, the Album code resides in page 1 of the AMS, which is mapped
to act as >C000 while Album itself is in control.

Fringe Benefits

By our using the >B000 and >C000 sections of high memory as the initial
load area for Album, we not only made it possible to run Album without
Mini-Memory, but also made it possible to load the two program files in
many ways. There is even a LOAD program on the disk which will load both
programs from Extended Basic. Both can also be loaded via Load Master by
selecting MASEXA from its catalog listing. These two programs can also
be loaded via Ramdisk menu, from Funnelweb, or from E/A Option 5 itself.

Yes, there is a Santa Claus, and he's offered up an interesting gift
in the AMS version of MIDI-Master.

Cataloging the SCSI drive

Our friend Lew King has inspired several of our AMS products since
he first purchased his AMS card. This time, however, he's inspired a product
that doesn't need the AMS.

Lew reported that he was to a degree happy with his SCSI, except that
the cataloging program supplied with SCSI was written in Extended Basic,
and was painfully slow in operation. Lew had used our AMS Slideshow with
a sub-directory on his SCSI, so he knew that we had ready-made routines
capable of reading the catalog of any sub-directory on his SCSI (or the
root directory if desired).

The cataloging part of AMS Slideshow is tailored so that it "filters"
the file names, showing only those ending in _P, which are assumed to be
TI-Artist picture files. Lew figured (correctly) that we could remove that
file name filter and create a general-purpose cataloger for his SCSI.

It took only a few days to have an intial working version, and then
some refinements were added to make it a more complete product. The thing
Lew wanted most was speed, and this program gives him that. It reads a
directory or sub-directory from the SCSI in about a second or two depending
how many files are there. The list appears on screen with the first 22
files showing. FCTN-4, X, x, CTRL-X or FCTN-X "pages" through the list
in the forward direction and FCTN-6, E, e, CTRL-E or FCTN-E pages backward.

Two features are important to Lew, and probably to anyone else with
a SCSI. The initial prompt field allows up to a 40 character path name,
so that the exact path desired can be cataloged right away. For example,
if Lew wants to see what's in his UT sub-directory, he types SCS1.UT. at
the prompt, then presses ENTER and very quickly gets the contents of SCS1.UT
on screen.

The second important feature is that by simply pressing P or p while
the catalog is on screen, he gets a very rapid printout of that sub-directory
sent to his printer.

More "Fringe Benes"

SCSICAT works on Lew's SCSI drive, but also will catalog any of my
Horizon Ramdisks, any Floppy drive, and even the older Myarc Hard Drive
systems. Thus it's sort of a general purpose quick cataloger.

Today's Sidebar

Not too big this time, just a couple of sample "snippets" for your
amusement. First in the sidebar is the "move" part of the MIDI Album code.
This uses subroutines in the main program code, and if no AMS is found,
it branches to a place in the main code unconditionally. We've also shown
the code from the main program that sets page 1 to act as >C000, just so
you can make the connection.

There's also a small portion of source code from SCSICAT. In this case,
we wanted you to see a small trick we used to speed up the process of getting
the numeric variables from the VDP Buffer. By reading those directly from
VDP into FAC and ARG, we speed up the process of dealing with doing the
necessary floating point math operations. In the case of the numbers for
capacity of the SCSI drive, we keep these in floating point format because
they are generally too large to be converted to integer values. For types,
sizes and record lengths of files, we convert to integers before doing
anything else with them.

The file records from the catalog get tucked away in memory as groups
of 16 bytes each. That's ten for the name, (which we fill out to ten with
spaces) then two bytes for each number after conversion to integer format.

Another Myarc Mystery

For some reason, files of the D/V 80 type that we have gotten from
Geneve users do not have the usual 2 reported in the TYPE number from the
catalog operation. Instead, their type is given as 18! On our Ramdisk menu's
Show Directory function, these show up as H80 instead of d80. It took a
while to figure out what to do with these, so they'd be properly identified
as DIS/VAR 80.

In the end it was quite easy, since 18 when expressed in Hex is >12.
Thus if we simply ANDI the value to 7, that strips off the 1 hex digit,
leaving just the 2, which our program translates to DIS/VAR for display.
For those who want to play around with such things, we'll pass along that
we found out the TYPE number for sub-directory names on SCSI drives.

They show up as type 6, when you might have thought type numbers didn't
go past 5. In SCSICAT, those get reported on the screen and printouts as
SUB-DIR, with no sector size (always 2) or record size shown. We don't
have a clue why those Geneve files show up as TYPE 18, but at least we
found an easy way to deal with them. Load Master, by the way, is not confused
by these files, as it examines the directory sector bit-by-bit and correctly
identifies these that way.

Load Master cannot, however, catalog SCSI or hard drives of any kind.
It works on floppies and Ramdisk drives only.

That's it for this time. Hope you'll enjoy this rather heavy stuff.

==================================

* SIDEBAR 77

* SOME SNIPPETS FOR YOUR AMUSEMENT

* CODE BY BRUCE HARRISON

*

* PART ONE FROM NEW MIDI ALBUM

*

DEF ALSTRT

AORG >BFB8

ALSTRT LWPI >8320 WORKSPACE IN RAM PAD

BL @AMSINI INITIALIZE AMS MAP

C R1,@>401E IS AMS PRESENT?

JEQ ALSTR0 IF SO, PROCEED

B @NOAMS ELSE BRANCH INTO MAIN PROGRAM

ALSTR0 SBO 0 TURN ON AMS CARD

LI R1,>100 1 IN LEFT BYTE R1

MOVB R1,@>4014 SETS PAGE 1 TO >A000

SBZ 0 CARD OFF

SBO 1 MAPPER ON

LI R0,ALENT START OF ALBUM CODE (>C000)

LI R1,>A000 START OF PAGE 1 (AS >A000)

LI R4,ALEND->C000 LENGTH OF STUFF TO MOVE

MOVALB MOV *R0+,*R1+ MOVE A WORD OF ALBUM TO PAGE 1

DECT R4 DEC COUNT BY 2

JGT MOVALB IF >0, REPEAT

SETO @ALBFLG SET ALBUM FLAG IN MAIN PROGRAM

BL @SETP1C SET PAGE 1 TO >C000

JMP ALENT JUMP TO START OF ALBUM

ENDMOV EQU $

AORG >C000 LOADS AT >C000 IN HIGH MEMORY

ALENT B @ALBNTR BRANCH TO START OF CODE

*

* FOLLOWING ARE SUBROUTINES IN MAIN

* MIDI-MASTER THAT ARE USED BY THE ABOVE

*

* AMSINI - INITIALIZES MAPPING OF AMS CARD TO "NORMAL"

* MEANING PAGES ARE AT THEIR NAMED ADDRESSES

* E.G PAGE 2 IS >2000, 10 IS AT >A000, ETC

* MAPPER IS NOT TURNED ON

AMSINI LI R12,>1E00 AMS CRU BASE

SBO 0 TURN ON AMS

LI R1,>FEFF -257 IN R1

LI R0,>4000 START OF MEMORY

AMSLP AI R1,>0101 ADD 1 PAGE (257)

MOV R1,*R0+ MOVE 2 BYTES TO MEM-MAPPER

CI R0,>4020 ALL DONE?

JLT AMSLP NO, INIT MORE

RT RETURN

*

* ROUTINE SETP1C

* SETS AMS PAGE 1 TO >C000

*

SETP1C LI R12,>1E00 AMS CARD CRU

SBZ 1 TURN OFF MAPPER

SBO 0 TURN ON CARD

LI R1,>100 1 IN LEFT BYTE R1

MOVB R1,@>4018 PAGE TO >C000

SBZ 0 TURN OFF CARD

SBO 1 TURN ON MAPPER

RT RETURN

*

* PART TWO - SNIPPET FROM SCSICAT

*

* AT THIS STAGE, CATALOG FILE IS OPEN

* AND WE'RE READING THE DISKNAME RECORD (#0)

*

RDDNAM LI R1,>0200 READ OPCODE

BL @DSOP3 SUBROUTINE PERFORMS READ

JNE RDNM1 JUMP IF NO ERROR

B @REDERR ELSE REPORT ERROR

RDNM1 LI R0,>1000 VDP BUFFER

MOV R0,R6 SAVE ADDRESS IN R6

INCT R6 ADD 2 TO R6

BLWP @VSBR READ LENGTH OF DISK NAME

MOVB R1,@DNAME MOVE TO STORAGE

MOVB R1,R2 AND TO R2

SRL R2,8 RIGHT JUSTIFY

MOV R2,R4 STASH IN R4

JEQ CLRROW IF ZERO, SKIP AHEAD

INC R0 R0 POINTS AT NAME ITSELF

LI R1,DNAME+1 TEXT STORAGE

BLWP @VMBR READ THE DISK NAME

CLRROW CLR R0 SCREEN ORIGIN

LI R2,40 40 CHAR ROW

BL @CLFLD CLEAR TOP ROW OF SCREEN

CLR R5 R5=0

LI R1,DNAME POINT AT STASHED DISK NAME

BL @DISSTR DISPLAY THAT

A R4,R5 ADD SAVED LENGTH TO R5

NONAM MOV R6,R0 GET R6 BACK INTO R0

A R4,R0 ADD LENGTH OF DISK NAME

AI R0,9 SKIP OVER THE F.P TYPE NUMBER

LI R1,>835C POINT AT F.P. ARGUMENT IN PAD

LI R2,8 EIGHT BYTES IN F.P. NUMBER

BLWP @VMBR READ TOTAL CAPACITY ON DRIVE

AI R0,9 AHEAD TO NEXT F.P. NUMBER

MOV R0,R6 SAVE R0 IN R6 AGAIN

LI R1,>834A POINT AT F.P. ACCUMULATOR IN PAD

BLWP @VMBR READ EIGHT BYTES (SECTORS FREE)

BLWP @XMLLNK USE XMLLNK

DATA >0700 SUBTRACT FAC FROM ARG (RESULT AT FAC)

LI R0,USDNUM SECTORS USED STORAGE

PUTUSD MOVB *R1+,*R0+ COPY A BYTE FROM FAC TO USED

DEC R2 DEC COUNT

JNE PUTUSD REPEAT IF NOT 0

MOV R5,R0 GET SCREEN LOCATION BACK FROM R5

BL @DISFPN SUBROUTINE DISPLAYS FLOATING POINT # (SECTORS USED)

INC R0 POINT AHEAD ONE SPOT

MOV R0,R5 SAVE ADDR IN R5

LI R1,USDSTR "USED"

BL @DISSTR DISPLAY THAT

A R2,R5 ADD LENGTH

MOV R6,R0 GET FILE RECORD ADDRESS BACK

LI R2,8 EIGHT BYTES

LI R1,>834A FLOATING POINT ACCUMULATOR

BLWP @VMBR SECTORS FREE NUMBER AGAIN

LI R1,FRENUM AND OUR STORAGE FOR LATER

BLWP @VMBR READ INTO STORAGE

MOV R5,R0 SCREEN ADDRESS BACK IN R0

BL @DISFPN DISPLAY FLOATING POINT #

INC R0 POINT AHEAD ONE

LI R1,FRESTR "FREE"

BL @DISSTR DISPLAY THAT

*

* THAT'S IT

 

 

 



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